Home > All, God, Philosophy, Religion, Science, Skepticism > Does It Help To Believe God Did It?

Does It Help To Believe God Did It?

Introduction

The other day I was listening to an episode of The Infidel Guy. Specifically, the episode where Reggie was debating Kent Hovind, the Intelligent Design (Creationist) whacko.

Following that 2-hour debate, my thoughts began to wander over the next few days. Hovind’s basic premise is that God created the world in 6 literal days. He also claims that this is Christian “Science.” His Young Earth Creationism is “science” in his mind.

Hovind says Creationism is science. But, I think he fails to understand what exactly science is. He says that there’s no evidence to support evolution. Yet, he provides no evidence to support God creating the world in 6 literal days. He even admits, on the show, that belief in Creationism is faith-based. Although, he also claims that “belief” in evolution is faith-based.

There’s a huge, glaring problem with his analysis, though…

Applications Of Creation Science

At the very end of the show, a geneticist called in, asking Hovind if he thought his ideas were scientific. He, obviously, replied that they were.

And this is where religion and science part ways. One of the main objectives in science is to create real-world applications from its discoveries. And, in order for that to happen, theories in science have to be able to make predictions.

When pressed for answers, or more precisely, pressed for a scientific application that could be used from knowing God created the world in 6 literal days, Hovind repeatedly danced around the issue, refusing to answer the question.

And with good reason. There is no real-world application from knowing God created the Earth in 6 literal days. In fact, it would hinder science to even consider that premise.

There’s no way you can use that information to better the human condition, or to generate new technology – in contrast with understanding the principles behind modern medicine and biology (based entirely on evolutionary theory), which provides us with cures for diseases and bettering of the quality of life for humans. Not a common trait of religion.

There is nothing about religion and the “scientific” claims that it’s proponents put forth that can make any predictions about any physical phenomena.

In science, plate tectonic theory predicts how continents will move over time, Germ Theory describes and predicts how diseases behave, and then, of course, there’s the good old Theory Of Gravity and Evolutionary Theory.

Creation “science” can predict nothing.

God Is Not Exempt From Logic

Let’s assume God did, in fact, create the Earth in 6 literal days. Ok. Fine. That doesn’t answer any questions.

How did God do it? Who created God? Is it turtles all the way down? You can’t assume that the Universe is too complicated to just have formed on its own, yet conclude that a God with infinite powers could just have always been. It’s absurd. As Bertrand Russell said in Why I Am Not A Christian

If everything must have a cause, then God must have a cause. If there can be anything without a cause, it may just as well be the world as God, so that there cannot be any validity in that argument. It is exactly of the same nature as the Hindu’s view, that the world rested upon an elephant and the elephant rested upon a tortoise; and when they said, “How about the tortoise?” the Indian said, “Suppose we change the subject.

The Idea Of God Does Not Advance Science

Back to the question posed for Hovind. Are there any applications in “Creation Science” that can be used in real-world situations which will enhance our understanding of the Universe?

No. There aren’t any. And this is why science is, in an epistemological sense, superior to religion. It serves no purpose to consider God in the lab, or in any scenario where we are searching for knowledge and understanding. In fact, it hinders progress.

Let’s take electricity, for an example. What do we understand about electricity? We know how it flows, we know which materials conduct and resist it. We know, basically, everything about it, with this knowledge coming mostly from Atomic Theory. And what role does God play?

None.

What would happen if we tried to insert God? Well, nothing. What role would God play? Essentially, a believer would simply say, “Electricity works that way because God made it work that way.” This doesn’t help matters.

But, Maxwell was able to determine exactly why electricity works the way it does with his equations. And if you look closely, you’ll notice in those equations that the name “God” doesn’t appear anywhere in there. And yet, they still manage to explain everything perfectly. God is not needed to explain these things.

Take No Thought For Tomorrow

So what does this all mean? Essentially, the basic premise behind Creationist arguments is that things are the way they are because God did it. But, in the lab, that answer is not enough. We need to know the why’s and how’s. To simply insert magical thinking distorts and confuses matters. If there is a God who can reach in and “mess with” our test results, then the result is chaos. We couldn’t rely on any observations simply because we wouldn’t know if God is messing with things.

In science, we have to assume there is no God messing with things in order to get accurate results. To extrapolate this further, to common, everyday experience, we have to live life assuming there is no God in order to function. We can’t depend on a God to “make things right,” or to hope he will take care of us. If we were to take the Bible’s advice (Matthew 6:28-33), in the words of Jesus…

28 And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

29 And yet I say unto you, That even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.

30 Wherefore, if God so clothe the grass of the field, which to day is, and to morrow is cast into the oven, shall he not much more clothe you, O ye of little faith?

31 Therefore take no thought, saying, What shall we eat? or, What shall we drink? or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed?

32 (For after all these things do the Gentiles seek: ) for your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things.

33 But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you…

It’s impossible to live that way. No one, in reality, lives life like God is going to take care of everything. That mind-set is saved for Sunday morning. When one is sitting in the pew, safe from having to make any decisions.

No one walks into a busy street without looking both ways because they’ve decided to “take no thought” for tomorrow. You might seek first the kingdom of Heaven, but in the meantime, you should probably look both ways before crossing the road. The laws of physics don’t stop for God.

You have to look out for yourself. God is not going to do it for you. That type of thinking is dangerous.

Conclusion

I could go on, but I’m heading toward the topic of Free Will, and it’s not something I want to get into right now. What I will do is say that I’m open to criticism and constructive dialogue. If I’m wrong, tell me.

But, don’t expect me to just take your word for it. I’ll need evidence. Show me where I’m wrong. Don’t tell me that I don’t have enough “faith,” because that is not an answer. You have faith in Jesus, and another person has faith in Allah, and someone else has faith in Krishna. They are all equally faithful and they can’t all be right. And, in fact, they’re all on equal footing. The best any of these groups can do is claim “faith.”

And faith is not, contrary to popular opinion, a virtue. Belief in something for no other reason than because you choose to is not a valid reason. At least, not in terms of using that reason to convince others that they, also, need to believe. There needs to be some type of evidence. Some tangible reason to accept a belief system. You wouldn’t take a pill Phizer created just because you’ve got “faith” in the drug’s effectiveness. Where are the results of the clinical trials?

Ok, so that’s enough for now. I’ll end with that.

Read a book. It’s good for you.

Advertisements
  1. ichabod
    Monday March 9, 2009 at 8:49 PM

    Hi GodKillzYou;

    You are an intelligent human being with a gift.

    I agree with much of what you write in respect to religion.

    This six day thing is something we will never really understand neither is big bang and evolution in my mind.

    Eternity is a concept I think I can understand a little, no beginning or end. In nature life has cycles, reproduction, birth and death, yet the stuff that makes us what we are, water and minerals, are all recycled back to earth after we die.

    This little process we all experience also limits our imaginations for if we began, the universe and everything else must have a beginning. The fact that our “time” is limited relates to creation in a time frame which may or may not be valid.

    This whole concept of life intrigues me more than science or religion. I am not a bible thumper nor well versed in the sciences, it appears you are far more expert in that arena than I.

    I will refer to the book of Genesis for something I found intriguing and science has only discovered this lately. The book says “Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years: Gen 1:15 And let them be for lights in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth: and it was so. ”

    I always assumed that space was a black empty void outside of the obvious. The writers of Genesis referred to space as a firmament, something I always considered ridiculous. However I read a few articles that report that NASA has discovered that space is not void but is filled with a plasma type substance, or that is what I understood.

    There is more to this thing called life that meets the eye and I think that many generations ago there were civilizations on this planet that may have been more aware than we give them credit for and some of these appear in writings, but maybe the writer didn’t have the words in his or her vocabulary to accurately depict what they were really trying to say.

    Anyway, those are only thoughts of mine and I do stray on occasion.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Tell Me What You Think...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: